Inflammation

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What to Do If You Have Inflammation Acne?

We might not think of it this way, but the skin is our largest organ. As such, it provides an outward reflection of the quality of your health deeper within. That’s especially true of your complexion and whether you are dealing with acne.

Exercise and Inflammation

Regular exercise reduces the risk of chronic metabolic and cardiorespiratory diseases, in part because exercise exerts anti-inflammatory effects. Regular exercise is protective against several chronic diseases ranging from physiologic diseases such as cardiovascular disease to neurologic diseases such as dementia and depression. Exciting recent research points to chronic inflammation as an underlying contributor to many age-related chronic diseases. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies in animals and humans have shown both an acute and a chronic anti-inflammatory effect.

Acute and chronic inflammation compared

Acute Inflammation

  • Causative agents – harmful bacteria or injury to tissue
  • Major cells involved – mainly neutrophils, basophils (in the inflammatory response), and eosinophils (response to parasites and worms), and mononuclear cells (macrophages, monocytes)
  • Primary mediators – eicosanoids, vasoactive amines
  • Onset (when does the inflammation start) – straight away
  • Duration – short-lived, only a few days
  • Outcomes – the inflammation either gets better (resolution), develops into an abscess, or becomes a chronic inflammation

Chronic inflammation

  • Causative agent – non-degradable pathogens that cause persistent inflammation, infection with some types of viruses, persistent foreign bodies, overactive immune system reactions
  • Major cells involved – Macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells (these three are mononuclear cells), and fibroblasts
  • Primary mediators – reactive oxygen species, hydrolytic enzymes, IFN-γ and other cytokines, growth factors
  • Duration – from several months to years
  • Outcomes – the destruction of tissue, thickening and scarring of connective tissue (fibrosis), death of cells or tissues (necrosis)

What’s the difference between chronic inflammation and acute inflammation?

Acute inflammation – starts rapidly (rapid onset) and quickly becomes severe. Signs and symptoms are only present for a few days, but in some cases may persist for a few weeks.

Examples of diseases, conditions, and situations which can result in acute inflammation include: acute bronchitis, infected ingrown toenail, sore throat from a cold or flu, a scratch/cut on the skin, exercise (especially intense training), acute appendicitis, acute dermatitis, acute tonsillitis, acute infective meningitis, acute sinusitis, or a blow.

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Glucosamine in Joint Therapy

Glucosamine in joint therapy – human and equine

As surprising as it is, conventional medicine does not yet have a proven treatment for either the symptoms or the condition of Osteoarthritis.  In large part because of this, Glucosamine therapy has become the ‘go to’ treatment plan for many sufferers.  Despite not being approved by the US Food and Drug administration for medicinal use, it is one of the most common non-vitamin, non-mineral, dietary supplements used by adults in the US.

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